Morality Essential to Education

Morality Essential to Education

C. S. Lewis saw it coming. The brilliant writer, author of Mere Christianity and The Chronicles of Narnia, delivered a series of lectures 70 years ago that were later compiled in a short book called The Abolition of Man: How Education Develops Man’s Sense of Morality. In it he predicted the disastrous consequences of entering into a world where children are educated without reference to any transcendent, objective code of morality and ethics. We see some of those consequences in today’s headlines — rampant cheating among the best and brightest at an Ivy League college; horrific bullying by mere children; political leaders seeking to re-gain public trust while repeatedly violating what would once have been considered basic standards of decency. For the full article, read it on the Huffington Post:...
ACU Builds on America’s Heritage of Christian Higher Education

ACU Builds on America’s Heritage of Christian Higher Education

I was able to spend some time on the East Coast this summer, and was reminded again of our nation’s deep foundation of Christian faith. During my trip I visited a number of historic colleges, including Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Amherst. The consistent connection between these academically prestigious universities is the strong foundation each had in Jesus Christ and in preparing Christian leaders for service in the world. All have departed from that heritage, yet you can hardly escape their Christ-centered foundation because it is inscribed on the walls and monuments of these schools. At Yale we found an entire building whose interior was a tribute to those Yale students and faculty members who died in America’s wars – but at the same time an entire wall was dedicated to Yale’s Christian missionaries who were killed on the mission field. At Harvard, we saw the famous statue depicting the school’s namesake and founder, with an open Bible on his lap.  The Amherst campus includes a prominent statue of school founder Noah Webster, who created the American dictionary, and who famously said, “Education is useless without the Bible.” Amherst – now considered one of the top private colleges in the country — was so conservative and so committed to Scripture that it had difficulty receiving accreditation in the 19th century from the state of Massachusetts. At Princeton, in their enormous chapel we discovered this “Prayer for Princeton” – a prayer much more relevant for Arizona Christian University than any Ivy League school today: “O Eternal God The Creator and Preserver Of all mankind we beseech Thee To bestow upon this...
Arizona Christian University Commencement 2013

Arizona Christian University Commencement 2013

NBA legend Paul Westphal captivated a capacity crowd of about 1,300 with stories from the NBA and from his season as the school’s basketball coach during Commencement ceremonies for the 90 graduates of the Arizona Christian University Class of 2013 at Palmcroft Baptist Church May 25, 2013. Westphal told of the unique circumstances that led him from an NBA All-star playing career with the Phoenix Suns to becoming a volunteer coach for then-Southwestern College. “I was told the team practiced outdoors a couple of days per week, and practice could not conflict with the school’s singing group, because music came first,” Westphal said to an appreciative and amused audience of graduates and their family, friends and supporters. “I ended up doing a TV ad for a local health club that had a nice gym in exchange for indoor practice time.” Westphal told the story of Tim Fultz, a student who was asked to join the basketball team only because he had a car and was needed to drive the players from the college to the practice site several miles away. Fultz, who had not played high school basketball and usually played only in games that were blowouts, was forced into action late in a huge rivalry game. He was fouled repeatedly, and after missing 6 straight free throws he made two free throws to clinch the game and was carried off the court by jubilant teammates. Fultz became a missionary in Africa, and tragically lost his life in an accident there. His organs, including his heart, were transplanted and used in Africa to save lives. His tragic death led...
Constitution Day 2012

Constitution Day 2012

On Monday, September 17, 2012, we celebrate the 225th anniversary of the signing of the United States Constitution. The turmoil in much of the world last week, along with remembrances of the 2001 terrorist attacks and murders on American soil September 11, are in many ways vivid reminders that we live in an exceptional nation. The freedoms we have in America are unusual in our world, and the ideas our nation is based on are worthy of defending – not only militarily but also with our words and actions. Compared to the rest of the world today, and really, compared to the experience of most humans for thousands of years, most of us in America have lived our entire lives with levels of peace and prosperity unprecedented in human history. That is not an accident, but is largely a result of the choices made by America’s Founders more than two centuries ago. When we say America is an exceptional nation, we should be clear on what it means, and what it doesn’t mean: It does not mean America is perfect or above criticism. It certainly does not mean that the people of America are somehow more worthy of blessings than the people of other nations, or that we are somehow intrinsically better than other people – that would be unbiblical and wrong. What it does mean is that the ideas America was founded on – the notion that all men are created equal, that our rights come from God, not government, that the power of government should be limited and separated between various branches – are exceptional ideas. And...

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