Academics

Whether you feel called to fulltime ministry, business, education, government, or another field, ACU offers a rigorous academic program to help prepare you to transform culture with the truth of Christ. There are multiple degree options, all presented within a biblical framework. Plus all students graduate with a minor in Bible, regardless of major.

Academic Blog Posts


 

Fall 2016 Commencement

Fall 2016 Commencement

Arizona Christian University celebrated 27 students on Saturday, December 10 as the graduates walked across the stage at the institution’s Fall Commencement Ceremony at the Phoenix, AZ main campus. Bachelor’s degrees were awarded in Behavioral Health, Family Studies, Psychology, Christian Ministries, Biology, Business Administration, Communication, Elementary Education, Secondary Education, and Music. More than 500 people were in attendance. The program of the ceremony involved many Class of 2016 graduates, including ACU veterans leading the Pledge of Allegiance, Invocation by Ryan Lashua, a reading from Scripture by Kathleen Slagle, and Benediction by Makenzie McKown. Class of 2017 music student, Kaylee Franks, lead both the processional and recessional on piano, and music faculty member Martha Irvine sang The Star Spangled Banner. ACU’s retiring Provost, Dr. Gary Damore, shared wisdom and encouragement with the graduating class before presenting the candidates to their proud friends and family members. After awarding the students their diplomas, ACU President Len Munsil delivered the “charge” to the graduates following a prayer of dedication by Campus Pastor, Tim Reed. The ceremony was followed by a dessert reception in the newly renovated Student Activity Center lobby, featuring live music by ACU’s Advance Band. If you weren’t able to join us, please watch ACU’s Fall 2016 Commencement Ceremony below.  ... read more
Teaching Millennials #connections

Teaching Millennials #connections

by Linnea Lyding, ACU Education Department Chair Millennials, it turns out, are on track to becoming “the most educated generation in American history” (Pew Research Center, 2010, p. 2).  As the ACU Education Department Chair, I decided it was time to learn as much as I could about this unique and passionate group of students that fill our university classrooms. Using a quick, informal survey of friends and family, I came up with six key words that relate to the activities of a Millennial.  The words are: selfies, snapchat, Instagram, Twitter, emojis, and hashtags.  At first glance, these words can give the impression of self-absorption.  However, I work with Millennials, and because of this, I see something deeper.  I see connections.  By staying connected in real time, they are able to share whom they are with, what they are doing, and how they are feeling with the world around them. Always curious and ready to act, Millennials enjoy reaching out with hashtags to find people to connect with on similar topics of interest. Millennials are often referred to as the “connected” generation, implying that they are constantly connected to technology.  I agree that they are “connected;” however, I would say their connections are much more personal than technological. According to the Pew Research Center (2010), Millennials “get along well with others, especially their elders” (p. 8).  Millennials are not only connected to their peers, but they also connect with and care about non-profit causes.  This is evidenced by the fact that “84% of Millennial employees made a charitable donation in 2014” (Achieve, 2015, p. 9), and they volunteered as... read more
What’s missing in American politics? Our Founders would say virtue and religion

What’s missing in American politics? Our Founders would say virtue and religion

I’m in the classroom every day with college students, most of whom will be voting for president for the first time in less than a week. As a political science professor, I am curious to hear what the next generation is thinking about the current state of American politics. What I hear consistently is what they don’t like about politics. They point first to the most obvious—the lack of character and integrity in the candidates and more generally in elected officials. They harbor an abiding distrust of politicians, who they see as fundamentally dishonest, willing to say anything to get elected. Like many Americans, they believe politicians are inherently self-interested, more concerned about their own power than the common good or the needs of the average voter. They are disgusted with the corruption they see in American politics. They want authenticity in their candidates. But more troubling, they are deeply suspicious of American institutions. They don’t trust the government at any level. They generally believe the economic system is “rigged” against them. And they are particularly disillusioned with the news media. As they prepare to vote, they are desperate to know where they can go for accurate information to inform their decision. They instinctively recoil at the “spin” of the news media, and distrust any political news, no matter the source. These concerns expressed by the next generation are spot on, mirroring those of the American electorate at large. Polls show that trust in government and other institutions is at an historic low. An extensive Pew Research Center poll from 1958 to 2015 shows trust in government in a free... read more

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